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  • To preserve and sustain the unique character of the Little Spokane River Valley, including it's open space and natural setting.
  • To maintain lower density zoning.
  • To protect the area's ecosystem including water quality, wetlands, priority habitat and wildlife, and dwindling native vegetation.
  • To encourage the development of area parks and natural areas.
  • To educate public officials of the concerns of the Friends of the Little Spokane River Valley, and be pro-active when major issues are at the forefront.



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    Welcome to the Friends of the Little Spokane River Valley

    Readings about our Little Spokane River Valley
    There is a scattered “library” of lore about our area.



    Fortunately, we are gathering materials and creating a bibliography so that the reader can find out about the rich geological, cultural, and historical information that has been recorded about it.



    Unfortunately, none of the material is located in one easily accessible location. We welcome suggestions on how to house this large and growing collection.



    To begin our on-going effort to create a regional bibliography we start with two public libraries which offer research support:



    1. The downtown Spokane Public Library’s Northwest History Room

    “The Spokane Public Library is honored to house one of the finest and most extensive Northwest collections in the country. Comprising over 10,000 items, this superb collection is readily available to the public during normal library hours. The collection consists of reference books, maps, directories, periodicals, government documents, and archival materials pertaining to the history, exploration, and settlement of the Northwest, or that region including Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and the province of British Columbia. The Northwest Room offers information on every period from the late 1700's to the present.

    While there is emphasis on early voyages and overland expeditions, Indians, the fur trade, missions and pioneer life, materials on a wide variety of subjects such as flora and fauna, industries, biographies, art, and literature are also included. Personal journals and reminiscences, local histories, and descriptive materials are an important part of the continually growing collection.”

    906 W. Main, Spokane, WA 99201, 444-5388



    2. The Joel E. Ferris Research Library & Archives at the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture which:

    “collects and makes publicly available research of primary and secondary sources that document and interpret the regional history, art, and culture of the Inland Northwest.”

    2316 W. First Avenue, Spokane, WA 99201, 363-5342

    archives@northwestmuseum.org

    3. “The Little Spokane River Valley Trails & Pathways System Concept Plan”, 2002. (A collaborative effort of the Friends of the Little Spokane River Valley Trail Committee and Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance Program of The National Park Service adopted by Spokane County Commissioners.)



    4. Critters of the Little Spokane Watershed, edited by Easy, Little Spokane Watershed Council, 1996.

    “A guide and photographic tour of native plants, fungi, insects, wildlife, habitats, and their inter-relationships.”



    5. Ringo, Kathryne Schoedel, The Milltown Buckeye, Washington and Surrounding Area 1889 to 1912, Spokane, Washington, 1977.

    The milltown was a vibrant and thriving community which relied on the heavily timbered Little Spokane River area for its industry. Our trail plans include a walking pathway through it.



    This bibliography is just in the beginning stages. Please send suggestions to Michael Kennedy kennedyme@comcast.net



    Submitted by Tina Wynecoop



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