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  • To preserve and sustain the unique character of the Little Spokane River Valley, including it's open space and natural setting.
  • To maintain lower density zoning.
  • To protect the area's ecosystem including water quality, wetlands, priority habitat and wildlife, and dwindling native vegetation.
  • To encourage the development of area parks and natural areas.
  • To educate public officials of the concerns of the Friends of the Little Spokane River Valley, and be pro-active when major issues are at the forefront.



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    Welcome to the Friends of the Little Spokane River Valley

    Trees and Trails
    by Jim Ellis
    In order to allow reasonable travel by trails or roads, it is necessary to clear the "right of way." In so doing, much brush and trees are removed. The number of trees removed is up to the discretion of the planners. When we work as a volunteer group, we have some control over which and how many trees are removed and where possible we have worked with adjacent property owners to get their input.



    When we accept "government money" to build trails we lose virtually all control, not only on the trail width but also on which trees will be removed. When the trees were marked for the trail built under a government contract in 08 with your tax dollars, many of the board members protested the potential removal. We lost!



    As a result of the tree removal along Little Spokane River Drive near Midway Road many of us were not pleased and now we are looking to plant trees or shrubs to attempt to regain some of the rural feeling that was lost. In planning the planting process some things become apparent to those of us who have had experience in that area locally. First, animals like us humans, notice when things change. We miss trees and they notice new trees. Their curiosity has been the death to some trees new to them. Although the spring is the time that most planting is done, our summers can be very dry and survival difficult. See the survival in the planted area on Haynes Conservation Futures property.



    As we move toward planting, it appears the best time to plant, in this area, would be Fall. The ground should be preferably damp or well watered. After planting, the trees should be protected against mechanical damage by deer and snow with open screening material that is self supporting. Where trees are to be transplanted it has been noted that they survive best when kept in the same orientation. Mark the North side and plant in the same orientation. Even plants sometimes do not like change. Keeping the area damp during the root adaptation time seems to help the successful adaptation to the new home.



    Little Spokane Garden Club will be coordinating plantings with FLSRV this fall and we will be looking for volunteers to help.



    If you are available for this project, please call: Martha Schaefer - 468-9721

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